This is part of the Top 40 of Sliabh Luachra project, an admittedly flawed and limited endeavor based on entirely subjective criteria. Please leave a comment if you have any questions, thoughts, protests, threats, etc, and click on the irishtune.info links for more information on each tune.

In Sliabh Luachra, there are some jigs that are lively and simple dance tunes. Some of these even live double lives as slides (and vice versa.) There are other jigs which are stately and elaborate, prime vehicles for the high-art listening music prized by Pádraig O’Keeffe and others. (These often contain more than two parts and consist of increasingly elaborate variations on a main melodic theme. It seems likely that these tunes are a continuation of the practice of the Munster pipers whose music was collected by Canon Goodman but whose tradition had pretty much ended by the time sound recording came to Sliabh Luachra.) Neither approach seems to be more recent or more ancient than the other. In both of these cases, the Sliabh Luachra jigs will often have certain characteristics that brand them as belonging particularly to the region, but I’m afraid it’s beyond my powers of description to really say what those characteristics are. Certainly the jigs should not be overlooked if one wants to understand the full breadth of the Sliabh Luachra tradition. If your favorite jig isn’t represented (or if a particularly hated jig has reared its ugly head), leave a comment below!

CONTENTS:

Apples in Winter
Art O’Keeffe’s
The Bank of Turf
Breeches Mary/The Tenpenny Bit
Bridget McRory
The Butcher’s March
An Cailín an Tí Mhór
Connie O’Connell’s
Coppers and Brass
The Cordal
The Ducks in the Oats
Ellen O’Leary’s
Fanning’s
The Frost is All Over
Gallagher’s
The Humours of Lisheen
I Will if I Can
Johnny O’Leary’s
The Kilkenny
The Lark in the Morning
Molly Myers’
The Munster
Munster Buttermilk

The Munster Storyteller
Nell Sullivan’s
The Old Walls of Liscarrol
Paddy Lyons’
Pádraig O’Keeffe’s
Páití Leary’s
Peig sa Susa
The Rambling Pitchfork
The Scartaglin
Sheehan’s set
The Slopes of Sliabh Luachra
A Tailor I Am/Tell Her I Am
The Thrush on the Strand or in the Straw
Tom Billy’s set
Tom O’Connor’s
The Trip to the Quarry
The Trooper

Apples in Winter

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/83/

The two-part version was recorded by Michael Coleman, and therefore is ubiquitous throughout Ireland, but the four-part setting is particular to Sliabh Luachra. Apparently the extra parts were devised by Pádraig O’Keeffe. The story goes that he get bored when playing all day for dancers at the Castleisland Feis, and would come up with ever more creative variations on the spot to keep himself amused. The new parts that particularly pleased him would become part of the tune from then on.

Denis Murphy plays the four-part Apples in Winter from his RTÉ recordings

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Art O’Keeffe’s

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/2189/

One of a number of tunes the Weaver Murphys got from their neighbor Art O’Keeffe, and which still bear his name. Art had a wealth of tunes from Tom Billy, and represents the vibrant Sliabh Luachra scene that existed even before Pádraig O’Keeffe’s rise to influence.

Julia Clifford plays Art O’Keeffe’s from The Humours of Lisheen

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The Bank of Turf

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/115/

There is an oft-repeated story about how this tune got its name. Pádraig and Denis were digging peat together, and Pádraig was whistling to stave off the boredom. He struck up this jig and Denis remarked that he hadn’t heard it before. Quick as you please, Pádraig wielded his slean upon the side of the ditch where they were cutting, and soon had the tune written out in his usual notation for Denis’ edification. When asked the name, he replied that he had none, whereupon Denis immediately christened it The Bank of Turf. We are left to speculate whether he was charged for the impromptu lesson! (There’s a difference of opinion about which tune really deserves the name, this jig, or the hornpipe otherwise known as Callaghan’s Low. Something to argue about at 4:00 AM in the River Island Bodega, perhaps.) Johnny O’Leary gave it the unwieldy name The First Cousin To The Gallant Tipperary Boys, perceiving a kinship with the slide of that name.

Denis and Julia play The Bank of Turf on The Star Above the Garter. Circumventing controversy, they simply list it as Padraig O’Keeffe’s jig.

Johnny O’Leary plays The Bank of Turf from his album Dance Music from the Cork-Kerry Border

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Breeches Mary/Tenpenny Bit

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/2665/

Denis Murphy and Julia Clifford recorded these together on The Blue Album. They may have come from Din Tarrant’s repertoire, but the first can be found in an 18th century collection of Scottish tunes. The second is played throughout Ireland, but the Murphys of Lisheen play a distinctive setting which is just about enough reason to include it in this list!

Denis and Julia play the Breeches Mary set from the blue album

Áine and Francis O’Connor play the set from their album They Didn’t Come Home Until Morning

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Bridget McRory

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3811/

Associated with Paddy Cronin though the only recording I’ve found of him playing it is the clip from the TV program included below. He may have gotten this one from O’Neill’s but the setting most people play differs from what’s in the book.

Paddy Cronin plays Bridget McRory on an old TV program

Donie Nolan plays Bridget McRory from his album The Banks of the Abha Bhán. (Recorded on a sharp pitched instrument, the clip has been pitched down to aid learners.)

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The Butcher’s March

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/6724/

This distinctive four-part setting comes from the playing of Molly Myers Murphy, and is likely to have come to her from Tom Billy. The more common setting is also quite popular throughout Sliabh Luachra. The four part version is an example of a tradition of long tunes which start with a melodic theme and then work through a series of variations on that theme in the following parts. Other jigs of this type include The Gold Ring, The Lark’s March, and The Old Grey Goose, and Johnny Cope is a hornpipe-time example. The title apparently comes from an old tradition of craftsmen’s guilds putting on special performances of dances at certain holidays.

Molly Myers Murphy plays her setting of The Butcher’s March

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An Cailín an Tí Mhór

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/720/

There are a few tunes which have related titles (e.g. The Woman of the House); it was kind of a meme at some point, I guess? This jig seems to have been a popular tune throughout Munster for a long time before what we currently think of as Sliabh Luachra music came to be. As is to be expected for an ancient melody, there are countless different versions, each belonging to a different musician or locality. Alan Ward maintains that the Lisheen Murphys got their setting (directly or indirectly) from Tom Billy Murphy. However, it would be strange if this wasn’t also in Pádraig O’Keeffe’s repertoire as well.

Denis Murphy plays An Cailín an Tí Mhór (the most commonly heard version). (Pitch adjusted to aid learning.)

Molly Myers Murphy plays an uncommon setting of An Cailín an Tí Mhór, or as she calls it, The Housekeeper’s jig. (Pitch adjusted to aid learners)

Maurice O’Keeffe plays his own setting of An Cailín an Tí Mhór (pitch adjusted).

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Connie O’Connell’s

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/381/

Jackie Daly and Seamus Creagh named this for their source on their LP, but it has been around for some time. Possibly came to Sliabh Luachra with a number of other tunes via Ryan’s Mammoth Collection.

Jackie and Seamus play Connie O’Connell’s

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Coppers and Brass

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1096/
https://www.irishtune.info/tune/858/

A well-used old tune that has been in the Munster tradition for long before Pádraig O’Keeffe, there are countless versions out there. Closely related to and often conflated with The Humours of Ennistymon which is a three-part setting devised by… well, it’s unclear exactly who. Coppers and Brass usually refers to the two-part version, but O’Keeffe’s three-part setting is unique to him, and is seems to have his compositional touch in some of the twists and turns. It’s all a bit confusing!

Pádraig O’Keeffe plays his setting of Coppers and Brass (pitch adjusted to aid learners)

The only recording known of Bill “The Weaver” Murphy features him playing a brief snippet on the whistle, preceded by Johnny O’Leary’s later reminiscence of how the recording came to be:

For purposes of disambiguation, Paddy Cronin plays The Humours of Ennistymon (pitch adjusted)

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The Cordal

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3410/

Before the 1830s when the British Army built the long straight road from Castleisland to Rathmore, the village and surrounding townland of Cordal would have been very out of the way, and even afterwards it’s not exactly a bustling hive of industry. However, a surprising number of noted musicians called Cordal home, and one could reasonably make a case that Cordal lies at the very heart of Sliabh Luachra music. Reason enough to name this tune (though it is very old and has had many names before it) after the celebrated locality.

Julia Clifford plays the Cordal jig

Bryan O’Leary plays the Cordal jig

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The Ducks in the Oats

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3025/

Julia Clifford always said that this was the first tune she ever learned to play. She’d been pestering her older siblings to let her have a go on the fiddle, and her brother Thady gave her the first half of this tune to work on. One wonders if he gave her an especially tricky one to start with in order to keep her busy for a while! Denis Murphy had a bit of verse to go with this:

The ducks in the oats and no-one to turn them,
Muise, Dia linn, what will we do with ’em?
The drake is inside and he’s calling the rest of them,
We won’t have a grain when the neighbour will call!

Paudie O’Connor and Aoife Ní Chaoimh play The Ducks in the Oats

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Ellen O’Leary’s

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/2540/

Named for Johnny O’Leary’s whistle-playing daughter. Presumably this is her favorite! It is very similar to the tune Woods of Old Limerick.

Ellen O’Leary Healy

Johnny plays Ellen’s jig

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Fanning’s

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3135/

Paired with Apples in Winter on a Denis Murphy recording, but also to be found in Pádraig O’Keeffe’s manuscripts. The identity of the eponymous Fanning has been lost to the mists of time.

Denis Murphy plays Fanning’s jig (pitch adjusted)

Jackie Daly plays Fanning’s

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The Frost is All Over

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/2775/

Johnny O’Leary is often credited with introducing the third part (though it can be found in O’Keeffe’s manuscripts) to this widespread jig (two part version: https://www.irishtune.info/tune/682/), but exactly where the new part should go is a matter of some debate. The melody is closely related to Kitty Lie Over and a number of other tunes associated with a popular ditty:

What would you do if the kettle boiled over?
What would I do? Only fill it again.
And what would you do if the cow ate the clover?
What would I do only set it again.
The praties are dug and the frost is all over
Kitty lie over close to the wall.
How would you like to be married to a soldier?
Kitty lie over close to the wall.
The praties all boil and the herring’s a roasting
Kitty lie over close to the wall.
You to be drunk and me to be sober
Kitty lie over close to the wall.
What would you do if you married a soldier
What would I do but to follow his gun?
And what would you do if he drowned in the ocean
What would I do but to marry again?

Johnny O’Leary and Denis “The Hat” McMahon play The Frost is All Over

Paudie O’Connor and Aoife Ní Chaoimh play The Frost is All Over

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Gallagher’s

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/6815/

An epic, 7-part jig (related to the Frieze Britches family of tunes) played by Pádraig O’Keeffe, seemingly intended to demonstrate his mastery. Though the tradition of elaborate, multi-part settings of this basic tune (based on an old song air) was already well established, it seems likely that O’Keeffe devised this particular setting himself.

Pádraig O’Keeffe plays Gallagher’s (pitch adjusted)

Gerry Harrington plays Gallagher’s from his album At Home.

The Humours of Lisheen

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1905/

Denis Murphy seems to have christened this tune (known elsewhere as the Thrush in the Straw [but let’s not confuse it with the other tune by that name] or The Woeful Widow) so it must have been a favorite of the Lisheen Murphys and their musical neighbors.

Eibhlín de Paor, Connie O’Connell, and Donie Nolan play The Humours of Lisheen

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I Will if I Can

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/342/ 

Appears on the Pádraig O’Keeffe LP after Coppers and Brass. It doesn’t seem to have been part of the general Sliabh Luachra repertoire before him—no one else from the area was recorded playing it. Pádraig may well have got it from either Ryan’s Mammoth Collection (where it’s listed as Kenmure’s On and Awa’) or O’Neill’s book.

Pádraig O’Keeffe plays I Will if I Can (pitch adjusted)

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Johnny O’Leary’s

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/2515/

#2 in Johnny O’Leary’s book (where he gives it the non-title Éireann Go Brách) and then again in more elaborate 3-part form as #181 (Hennigan’s Favourite) this is a great box tune, a great dance tune, and a perfect example of the other end of the spectrum from O’Keeffe’s elaborate, high-art jigs.

Seamus Creagh and Aidan Coffey play Johnny O’Leary’s (recorded on sharp-pitched instruments; pitch adjusted)

Julia Clifford and her sister Bridgie Kelliher play a different setting of Johnny O’Leary’s jig

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The Kilkenny

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3817/

This jig seems to have entered the Sliabh Luachra repertoire after Paddy Cronin recorded it on his LP Kerry’s Own in the 70s. It seems likely he found it in O’Neill’s book. O’Neill’s source for the tune was a Father Feilding of County Kilkenny, so it’s doubtful the melody had any Sliabh Luachra connections. However, it’s a testament to the impact of Paddy Cronin’s playing that, once he put his stamp on it, it became, and remains, a Sliabh Luachra favorite.

Bryan O’Leary and Colm Guilfoyle play the Kilkenny jig

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The Lark in the Morning

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/4235/

Johnny O’Leary apparently played this and attributed it to Pádraig O’Keeffe, but I can find no recordings of either of them playing it. It bears some passing similarity to the standard Lark in the Morning, as well as The House in the Glen, but also shares a B part (more or less) with Tom Connor’s jig. It would be interesting to see if it could be found in Pádraig’s manuscripts or other early documentation. It’s also possible it was a sort of amalgamation Johnny came up with.

Matt Cranitch plays Pádraig’s Lark in the Morning

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Molly Myers’

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3764/

One of many tunes named for Molly Myers Murphy, a student of Tom Billy’s who had a wealth of music, some of which few of her contemporaries seemed to share. The story goes that Denis Murphy and Johnny O’Leary were in the habit of stopping by for tea to pick up an old tune or two they could bring to the dance.

Ellen O’Leary, Bryan O’Leary, Gearóid Dinneen, and Colm Guilfoyle play Molly Myers’ jig in G

Bryan, solo this time, plays Molly Myers’ jig in the key of A

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The Munster

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/801/

Found in O’Neill’s Waifs and Strays as Jackson’s Bottle of Claret, this tune has a long history and life outside of Sliabh Luachra, but it seems to have been particularly beloved by Pádraig O’Keeffe’s coterie, and ever since it was recorded on The Star Above the Garter it has come to be strongly associated with this repertoire.

Paddy Cronin plays the Munster jig

Denis Doody plays the Munster jig

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Munster Buttermilk

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1373/

An old enough tune, it shares a common ancestor with The Frost is All Over and other Sliabh Luachra tunes in a melody found in Playford’s Dancing Master from 1651.

Eibhlín de Paor, Connie O’Connell, and Donie Nolan play Munster Buttermilk

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The Munster Storyteller

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3616/

Given to Breandán Breathnach by Denis Cronin with this title, but most often called Bill the Weaver’s, which implies it came from Bill Murphy’s repertoire. One of those tunes which no one can seem to agree which is the A part, sometimes leading to confusion at sessions!

Denis Murphy plays the Munster Storyteller (pitch adjusted)

Bryan O’Leary plays the Munster Storyteller

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Nell Sullivan’s

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3644/

Nell Spillane (nee Sullivan) was the sister of Thadelo Sullivan and seems to have been well regarded as a musician (concertina) in her own right, judging by the handful of tunes that still bear her name. Possibly a version of Pádraig O’Keeffe’s jig (see below).

Johnny O’Leary and Mick Duggan play Nell Sullivan’s

Paudie O’Connor and John O’Brien play Nell Sullivan’s

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The Old Walls of Liscarrol

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3097/

O’Neill’s 1001 and Ryan’s Mammoth Collection have versions of this but they are both pretty different from how they play it in Sliabh Lucahra. It is certainly possible this is one of Pádraig O’Keeffe’s elaborations. Not to be confused with the separate tune Walls of Liscarrol played more commonly throughout Ireland.

O’Neill’s setting, collected from Patrick Reidy of Castleisland, whose own source, Daniel Kelleher, is said to have been from the Muskerry region of Cork.

Pádraig O’Keeffe plays The Old Walls of Liscarroll

Jackie Daly and Matt Cranitch play The Old Walls of Liscarroll

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Paddy Lyons’

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1176/

Named for a friend and contemporary of Pádraig O’Keeffe’s. Johnny O’Leary remembered him as “… a travelling man who used to play the fiddle behind his back.” He used to stay with O’Keeffe when his perambulations brought him through Glountane.

Molly Myers Murphy plays Paddy Lyons’. It would be interesting to know if that’s what she called it. (pitch has been adjusted for learning)

Paudie and Aoife play Paddy Lyons’

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Pádraig O’Keeffe’s

not cataloged by irishtune.info

Pádraig O’Keeffe in 1957 at Lyon’s Bar in Scartaglin

This one doesn’t seem to have been recorded anywhere else beside Connie O’Connell’s album, and as such, I have a hard to justifying its inclusion in a “top 40” list. It’s a gem of a tune, though, so I’m throwing it in as a bit of a signal boost. Listen to the rest of Ceol go Maidin here: https://archive.comhaltas.ie/tracks/15473

Connie O’Connell plays Pádraig O’Keeffe’s jig

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Páití Leary’s

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/2481/

Johnny O’Leary named this for “an uncle of mine. He was the lad nearly pulled the two ears of me and I catching the ten-key accordion. He bought a ten-key accordion inside in Clarke’s of Killarney for 12/6, and when I’d get him out, do you see, he’d go out working, I’d go for the accordion. I was only about five years, five and a half. He came in one day that I had it and he caught me, and he had big nails out on his hands. Well he brought blood out through my two ears. Never again catch that’, he says, ‘while I’m outside the door.’ And he hadn’t a clue in the world about playing it himself.” Presumably Páití had ability enough to pass this tune along to Johnny, perhaps in later years when tempers had cooled!

Johnny O’Leary plays his uncle’s tune

Connie O’Connell, Áine & Francis O’Connor, Eibhlín De Paor, Michelle O’Sullivan, and Gearóid Dinneen play Paiti O’Leary’s

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Peig sa Susa

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1645/

A three-part version appears in O’Neill’s 1001 as the Hollyford Jig, but Paudie O’Connor found it tucked away as Peig sa Susa in a 1923 fiddle tutor by Treasa Ní Alpín. I haven’t been able to find it myself to see how close it is to O’Keeffe’s version. Sometimes confused with the Rambling Pitchfork or The Pipe on the Hob. The title roughly translates to Peig of the blanket, or in the blanket, which causes me to wonder if there is a connection to the “Old Woman Tossed Up in a Blanket” theme of tune titles, taken from an old nursery rhyme.

1923 fiddle tutor by Treasa Ní Alpín, Teagosc-Leabhar na Bheidhlíne

Pádraig O’Keeffe plays Peig sa Susa

Paudie O’Connor plays his setting of Peig sa Susa

The Rambling Pitchfork

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1644/

This tune is well-known throughout Ireland, but O’Keeffe’s setting has a number of nice details which seem to be particularly his.

Pádraig plays his setting of the Rambling Pitchfork; the setting varies a bit on the repeat. (pitch has been adjusted)

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The Scartaglin

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3652/

Scartaglin has long been a hub for the music of Sliabh Luachra, and as such has given its name to a handful of tunes. Pádraig’s local would have been Jack Lyons’ pub in Scart, a short walk (for him!) from his house.

Jackie Daly, John Faulkner and James Kelly play the Scartaglin jig

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Sheehan’s set

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/4526/
https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1761/
https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3331/

Pádraig O’Keeffe recorded these and they’ve been stuck together as one set ever since—you’d have a hard time playing the first without going into the next. (Having said that, you do sometimes find people playing a related jig, The Cat in the Corner https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3750/, in place of the first one, possibly without even realizing they are different tunes!) The second tune is notable for being a folkified version of an O’Carolan melody.

Pádraig O’Keeffe plays the Sheehan’s set (pitch adjusted)

Michelle O’Sullivan, Áine O’Connell and Francis O’Connor play the Sheehan’s set

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The Slopes of Sliabh Luachra

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/3233/

Usually played with three parts, but Billy Clifford and Denis Murphy recorded a two-part setting. Johnny O’Leary credited Pádraig O’Keeffe with adding the third part, and it does seem a little out of place–more slidey than its predecessors. It is related to a number of other melodies including the song Follow Me Down (or is it Up?) to Carlow.

Paudie and Noeleen O’Connor play the Slopes of Sliabh Luachra from the album The County Bounds

Denis Murphy and Billy Clifford play the two-part setting of The Slopes of Sliabh Luachra. Taken from the Comhaltas Archive, sorry about the jarring audio watermark!

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A Tailor I Am/Tell Her I Am

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/5966/

Paddy Cronin made a celebrated 78 recording of these two paired, and the two jigs and their titles have a tangled connection. One may be a mishearing or misremembering of the other, but which came first? Both titles are old, and matched with a number of different tunes. It seems likely that the there was once a song to go with them, as the title phrase matches up quite well with the rhythm, but the words seem to have been lost. The most notable difference is that Tell Her I Am is now popular throughout Ireland (though in a slightly different, 3-part setting), whereas the first tune is still a particular treasure of Sliabh Luachra.

Paddy Cronin plays A Tailor I Am and Tell Her I Am from his renowned 1949 radio tapes

From his album At Home, Gerry Harrington plays the Tailor Tell Her set, but he plays the first one down in C which makes a very interesting shift when he goes into the second tune.

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The Thrush on the Strand (or in the Straw)

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1321/

Recorded by John McKenna in 1937, but it seems to really have caught on with Pádraig O’Keeffe and his students. A bit of perennial confusion about the name…

Pádraig O’Keeffe, Denis Murphy, and Julia Clifford play the Thrush on Kerry Fiddles

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Tom Billy’s set

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1921/
https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1920/

Since recorded on The Star Above the Garter, these two are as inextricably linked as the chocolate and peanut butter in a Reeses Cup. Both are from Tom Billy’s repertoire. Though based in Cork, Tom had a number of students on the west bank of the Blackwater, which he considered part of his rightful territory. Denis Murphy and Dan O’Keeffe were just two of his many pupils in Kerry. When Pádraig O’Keeffe began teaching fiddle as his main occupation, a turf war between the two fiddle masters ensued. Pádraig cleverly (or deceitfully) poached as many of Tom’s tunes as he could, employing such tactics as lurking quietly in a house where the blind fiddler was playing and copying down any unfamiliar tunes in his signature notation. He would then teach these tunes to his own students, which had the effect of devaluing his rival’s repertoire.

Tom Billy Murphy

Denis and Julia play Tom Billy’s jigs from The Star Above the Garter (pitched has been moved up to aid learning)

Seamus Creagh plays Tom Billy’s set nice and steady for easy learning

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Tom O’Connor’s

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/1922/

Tom O’Connor was a fiddle player from Farrankeale, Cork, and the source of a small number of tunes. The B part gets around–it can also be found very slightly changed in O’Keeffe’s Lark in the Morning, and Denis Murphy played it as the A part of a tune he gave Breandán Breathnach which he called Put the Chain On the Donkey.

Matt Cranitch plays Tom O’Connor’s jig

Billy Clifford plays Tom O’Connor’s jig

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The Trip to the Quarry

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/6017/

This seems like a title Denis Murphy might have come up with on the fly, perhaps on the day he recorded it for Breandán Breathnach’s collection. There was a limestone quarry not far from Lisheen, and the crossroads there were a common site of gatherings and dances. Perhaps Denis was remembering an incident that Mike Duggan related: “Another night, Denis and I were cycling home with our fiddles on the carriers. Near the Quarry Cross, Denis’ light went out, he hit a big stone and fell off. Picking himself up, he said, ‘Thank God, ’twas myself that fell and not the fiddle!'”

Denis Murphy plays The Trip to the Quarry

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The Trooper

https://www.irishtune.info/tune/2470/

Johnny O’Leary says he got this from Tom Billy. It’s a straightened out version of the set dance The Orange Rogue.

Johnny O’Leary plays The Trooper

Connie O’Connell plays The Trooper

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